More than 55,000 Missourians now work in clean energy industries, an increase of 1,562 jobs in 2018, according to a new analysis of energy jobs data from Clean Energy Trust (CET) and the national, nonpartisan business group E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs).

Overall, Missouri now employs 55,869 workers in clean energy, which is 48,174 more workers than fossil fuels (7,695).

Missouri’s clean energy workforce employs more than six times as many people than all the computer programmers and web developers in the state, according to Department of Labor Employment Statistics.

Twelve Midwest states are home to 737,000 clean energy jobs, an increase of four percent in the past year. To see clean energy jobs by county in all 12 Midwest states, visit Clean Jobs Midwest.

Led by 4.2 percent growth in energy efficiency, Missouri’s clean energy jobs now make up 1.9 percent of all jobs in Missouri with employers expecting a 7.7 percent increase in jobs for 2019. Across all industries, clean jobs grew 2.9 percent in 2018.

“Clean energy is more important than ever to our economic future,” said Steve O’Rourke, principal of St. Louis-based EnerGuidance. “The transition away from reliance on fossil fuels is coming, and this report shows Missouri businesses and workers all over the state are not only benefitting, but are prepared to take advantage of a clean energy future.”

Energy efficiency again led all clean energy sectors in Missouri, employing 41,845 workers – accounting for seven in 10 of all clean energy workers. Advanced transportation came in second (5,973), followed by renewable energy generation (5,251).

The Clean Jobs Midwest report highlights Missouri’s growing importance in America’s transition to advanced transportation, with solar and wind energy now home to 4,309 jobs combined.

Contributing the most clean energy jobs were St. Louis County (12,202), Jackson County (9,167), and St. Louis City County (4,077). There are 32,588 jobs in St. Louis and Kansas City metro areas combined while 12,403 jobs came from the Missouri’s rural areas.

“With job growth across the renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, and advanced transportation sectors, this report shows that Midwestern economies are benefiting from the clean energy industry,” said Erik G. Birkerts, CEO of Clean Energy Trust. “This report indicates that the Midwest is creating jobs in the clean energy industry more quickly than the rest of the country – a sign the Midwest is a good place for clean energy businesses to grow.”

Detailed and interactive breakdowns of Missouri’s clean energy economy are available at Clean Jobs Midwest  – including job totals for every Missouri county, congressional district, and state legislative district.

Specifically, the report showed:

  • 1,889 Missourians now work in grid modernization (1,201) and energy storage (688).
  • Construction (50.5%) and manufacturing (22.6%) make up the majority of clean energy jobs.
  • Electric power generation jobs using fossil fuels (3,259) employed 1,992 less workers than renewable energy generation jobs (5,251).
  • Small businesses are driving Missouri’s clean energy sectors, with 70.5 percent of clean energy businesses employing fewer than 20 individuals.
  • 10.3 percent of Missourians employed in clean energy are veterans, compared to the national average of six percent.

Photo: NAIT / CC