Get ready to start planting your spring veggie garden with a visit to Kansas City Community Gardens’ outdoor plant sale this week.

You’ll find a variety of plants that were grown in the Kansas City Community Gardens (KCCG) greenhouse, including asparagus, berries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale and lettuce. Onion, leek and scallion plants and seed potatoes will also be available.

To allow for social distancing, the sale will be held in the KCCG parking lot at 6917 Kensington, Kansas City, MO from March 25-27. The first day of the sale, Thursday, March 25, is reserved from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. for KCCG Green Card (low-income) members. Beginning Friday, March 26, the sale is open to the public to purchase KCCG memberships, plants and seeds from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Thursday and Friday and 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. on Saturday.

KCCG will host a satellite sale from 5 – 6 p.m. Monday, March 28 at the Jersey Creek Community Garden, Heathwood Park at 11th Street and Parallel Parkway, Kansas City, KS.

After the sale days, plants will be available at the KCCG office through walk-up window service. Pre-orders may be placed online at KCCG.

KCCG is a non-profit membership organization with annual fees ranging from $2 – $25, based on income. Members receive 10 free packets of seeds, a 10-pound bag of fertilizer and discounted pricing on additional seeds, plants and supplies. Memberships may be purchased online at KCCG or at KCCG’s office.

Each year the garden provides nearly 50,000 seed packets, from arugula to watermelon, and more than 140,000 greenhouse seedlings to home and community gardeners.

In 2020, KCCG’s assisted 670 community and school garden and orchard sites and 2,548 home gardeners with seeds, plants and/or garden services. With increased interest in gardening during the pandemic, KCCG added more than 740 new households to its programs. As a result, KCCG estimates 37,000 households grew more than 1,026,200 pounds of food valued at more than $2 million. KCCG’s mission is to empower low-income households and community groups to cultivate food-producing gardens.